RESEARCH BASED ARTICLES ABOUT HAITI REVOLUTION

RESEARCH BASED ARTICLES ABOUT HAITI REVOLUTION

The Haitian Revolution begins with the Bois Caïman ceremony.  Ready to carry out their plans, the slaves meet in Morne-Rouge to make final preparations and to give instructions. The slaves decide that “Upon a given signal, the plantations would be systematically set aflame, and a generalized slave insurrection set afoot.” Rumors circulate that white masters and colonial authorities are on their way to France to fight the Crown’s recent decrees granting mulattoes and free blacks rights. Though false, these rumors “served as a rallying point around which to galvanize the aspirations of the slaves, to solidify and channel these into open rebellion.” 

White Jacobins/Black Jacobins: Bringing the Haitian and French Revolutions Together in the Classroom

French Historical Studies, Volume 23, Number 2, Spring 2000, pp.
259-275 (Article)


Published by Duke University Press

Historians of France are used to making difficult choices as they plan and revise their courses on the Revolution. The pre-Revolution, the post-Revolution, the economic, social, intellectual, cultural, and politi- cal perspectives, the new scholarship, the historiography, all compete for limited class time and student attention. Instructors struggle to de- liver it all with their own personal mix of primary sources, survey texts, course packs, novels, film, CD-ROMs, and, now, the Internet. How could one possibly squeeze another revolution into the same semester?

What the Haitian Revolution Might Tell Us about Development, Security, and the Politics of Race

International Relations, Victoria University of Wellington


INTRODUCTION

Conquest, it is affirmed, creates historic links. The new time inaugurated by the con- quest, which is a colonialist time because occupied by colonialist values .. . will be endowed with an absolute coefficient.. .. The history of the conquest, the historic devel- opment of the colonization and of the national spoliation, will be substituted for the real time of the exploited men.
——Frantz Fanon1
There was a time when Western political science was somewhat sensitized to the historical perspective from which “exploited men” might view the making of modern world order. During the Cold War, and with the rise of the Non-Aligned Movement especially, debates in the Western Academy made regular reference to what might be called the “development/security nexus.” Many political scientists claimed that the peculiarities of “Third World” development could engender security threats for the “First World.” But it was further acknowledged that Third World politicians (especially at the Bandung Conference in 1955) could see their post-colonial development threatened by a West that, still exhibiting racial hierarchies domestically, might wish to retain these hierarchies internationally.2

Unexploited Sources for the History of the Haitian Revolution


Source: Latin American Research Review, Vol. 18, No. 1 (1983), pp. 95-103
Published by: The Latin American Studies Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2502858
Accessed: 30/04/2014 17:49


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Latin American Research Review.

Troping Toussaint, Reading Revolution

Research in African Literatures, Volume 35, Number 2, Summer 2004, pp. 18-33 (Article)


Published by Indiana University Press
DOI: 10.1353/ral.2004.0050

Access provided by University of Miami (30 Apr 2014 17:50 GMT)


AB S T R AC T

What is the meaning of the Haitian Revolution for those who look back upon it in 2004? Does it reveal progress in social justice and universal human rights, or just the opposite? This essay focuses on the problem of progress and interpretation, looking to two interpretations of the Haitian Revolution that have received little or no analysis in this regard. While Aimé Césaire’s Toussaint Louverture has remained virtually unanalyzed in Césaire studies, the first great analysis of the Haitian Revolution, that of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right, offers an astonishingly progressive and sympathetic analysis that has yet to be considered in the literature on the revolution.

The World of the Haitian Revolution


Review by: Yvonne Fabella
NWIG: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, Vol. 85, No. 1/2 (2011), pp. 130-
132
Published by: BRILL on behalf of the KITLV, Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and
Caribbean Studies
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41850638
Accessed: 27/03/2014 14:06


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JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

BRILL and KITLV, Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to NWIG: New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids.

The Theater of the Haitian Revolution / The Haitian Revolution as Theater

The theatre had come to a town without theatres, and as a theatre would have to be created, they took advantage of a heaven-sent opportunity. Since its platform would make a good stage, the guillotine was moved to a nearby yard, where it was taken over by hens, who roosted on top of the uprights. The boards were brushed and scrubbed to remove all traces of bloodstains, an awning was stretched between the trees and rehearsals began of the work which was the most popular of their whole reper- toire, as much because of its world-wide fame as because some of its couplets had provided a foretaste of the revolutionary spirit—The Village Soothsayer by Jean Jacques.
—Alejo Carpentier, Explosion in a Cathedral

The Haitian Revolution, History's New Frontier: State of the Scholarship and Archival Sources

This article was downloaded by: [University of Miami] On: 26 March 2014, At: 17:10
Publisher: Routledge
Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK


Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies
Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/fsla20

To cite this article: Philippe R. Girard (2013) The Haitian Revolution, History's New Frontier: State of the Scholarship and Archival Sources, Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies, 34:3, 485-507, DOI: 10.1080/0144039X.2012.734089

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0144039X.2012.734089

The Haitian Revolution in Interstices and Shadows: A Re-reading of Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World

AB S T R AC T

Alejo Carpentier’s The Kingdom of this World (1949), the only sustained literary rendering of the Haitian Revolution in the Spanish Caribbean, is known both for its fictional treatment of Haitian history from a slave’s perspective and for the preface that claimed for that history the distinction of epitomizing marvel- ous realism in the Americas. This reading of the text’s approach to one of the salient foundational narratives of Caribbean history looks at how, despite the “minute correspondence of dates and chronology” of the events narrated in The Kingdom of This World, the version of Haitian history offered by Carpentier is a fractured tale whose fissures may be read as subverting the adherence to the facts of Haitian history and its primary sources that the author claims for his text. It looks specifically as how the erasure of the leaders of the Revolution from the text, particularly that of Jean-Jacques Dessalines, reveals Carpentier’s hopelessness concerning the Haitian land and its people.

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