RESEARCH BASED ARTICLES ABOUT HAITI REVOLUTION

RESEARCH BASED ARTICLES ABOUT HAITI REVOLUTION

The Haitian Revolution begins with the Bois Caïman ceremony.  Ready to carry out their plans, the slaves meet in Morne-Rouge to make final preparations and to give instructions. The slaves decide that “Upon a given signal, the plantations would be systematically set aflame, and a generalized slave insurrection set afoot.” Rumors circulate that white masters and colonial authorities are on their way to France to fight the Crown’s recent decrees granting mulattoes and free blacks rights. Though false, these rumors “served as a rallying point around which to galvanize the aspirations of the slaves, to solidify and channel these into open rebellion.” 

The Haitian Revolution and the Notion of Human Rights

The  Haitian  Revolution, long neglected and occasionally forgotten by historians, represents one of  the truly noteworthy achievements in the annals of world history. Among its many ac- complishments was a bold, though unsuccessful, attempt to advance universal human rights in the early nineteenth century. The measure was bold and farsighted. Had it succeeded, one of the greatest rev- olutions in the modern past would have fundamentally changed the course of history and the relations between the peoples of the earth. One of the cruel ironies of history is that so little is known or re- membered of one of the greatest and most noble revolutions of all time. And it is especially ironic that hardly anyone anywhere today associates Haiti with either democracy or the exercise of human rights. Nevertheless, Haiti played an inordinately important role in the articulation of a version of human rights as it forged the second independent state in modern history.

The Haitian Revolution and the articulation of a modernist epistemology

This article was downloaded by: [University of Miami] On: 27 March 2014, At: 08:12
Publisher: Routledge
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Critical Arts: South-North Cultural and Media
Studies
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Clinton Hutton
Published online: 21 Dec 2011.

To cite this article: Clinton Hutton (2011) The Haitian Revolution and the articulation of a modernist epistemology, Critical Arts: South-North Cultural and Media Studies, 25:4, 529-554, DOI:
10.1080/02560046.2011.639993

The Evolution of Land and Labor in the Haitian Revolution, 1791-1820

The Evolution of Land and Labor in the Haitian Revolution, 1791-1820
Author(s): Robert K. Lacerte
Source: The Americas, Vol. 34, No. 4 (Apr., 1978), pp. 449-459
Published by: Academy of American Franciscan History
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/981159
Accessed: 30/04/2014 16:58


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Teaching the Haitian Revolution: Its Place in Western and Modem World History

Teaching the Haitian Revolution: Its Place in Western and Modern World History
Author(s): Valentina Peguero
Reviewed work(s):
Source: The History Teacher, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Nov., 1998), pp. 33-41
Published by: Society for History Education
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/494418
Accessed: 02/11/2011 15:53


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Taking Haiti to the people: History and fiction of the Haitian revolution

This article was downloaded by: [University of Miami] On: 30 April 2014, At: 15:04
Publisher: Routledge
Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK


Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies
Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/fsla20

To cite this article: Sue Peabody (2006) Taking Haiti to the people: History and fiction of the Haitian revolution, Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies, 27:1, 125-132, DOI: 10.1080/01440390500500021

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01440390500500021

Saint Domingue in Virginia: Ideology, Local Meanings, and Resistance to Slavery, 1790-1800

Southern Historical Association


Saint Domingue in Virginia: Ideology, Local Meanings, and Resistance to Slavery, 1790-1800
Author(s): James Sidbury
Source: The Journal of Southern History, Vol. 63, No. 3 (Aug., 1997), pp. 531-552
Published by: Southern Historical Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2211649
Accessed: 30/04/2014 18:00


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JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

Paper Thin: Freedom and Re-enslavement in the Diaspora of the Haitian Revolution

There is not a single person in the world who does not know that a ship sailing through the sea leaves


Rebecca J. Scott is the Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Law at the University of Michigan < This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. >'; document.write(''); document.write(addy_text18750); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ;. She is the author of Degrees of Freedom: Louisiana and Cuba after Slavery (Harvard University Press, 2005) and co-author with Jean M. Hébrard of Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation (forthcoming, Harvard University Press, 2012). She thanks
Aharon Barak, Susanna Blumenthal, Richard Brooks, Sidney Chalhoub, Natalie Zemon Davis, Lo Faber, Ada Ferrer, Paul Finkelman, Allison Gorsuch, Malick Ghachem, Tom Green, Ariela Gross, Hendrik Hartog, Scott Hershovitz, Walter Johnson, Martha S. Jones, Alexandre Kedar, James Krier, Paul Lachance, Silvia Lara, Douglas Laycock, Christopher McCrudden, Julian Davis Mortenson, Kristin Mann, Graham Nessler, William Novak, Vernon Palmer, Sallyanne Payton, Bianca Premo, Richard Primus, Donald Regan, João Reis, Scott Shapiro, Jed Shugerman, Norman W. Spaulding, Eric Stein, Joseph Vining, James Whitman, John Witt, and other colleagues and students who have offered obser- vations and suggestions on various versions of this story. 

Opportunist or Patriot? Julien Raimond (1744–1801) and the Haitian Revolution

This article was downloaded by: [University of Miami]
On: 30 April 2014, At: 14:46
Publisher: Routledge
Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered
office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK


Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave
and Post-Slave Studies
Publication details, including instructions for authors and
subscription information:
http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/fsla20

Opportunist or Patriot? Julien Raimond
(1744–1801) and the Haitian Revolution
John D Garrigus a

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